Make 2015 the Year You Develop Executive Presence

executive presenceIf you have considered developing your Executive Presence, elevating your career, or acquiring highly rated credentials, 2015 may be your year to do it. It is a big year for Corporate Class Inc. and Executive Presence – not only are our public-enrollment programs and seminars back by popular demand, but also we are offering a brand new intensive certification program based on feedback of current and potential participants.

With the breadth and depth of our programs, we continue to cater to professionals with a variety of goals. Read about our upcoming sessions below and see which one could be right for you.

  • Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA) 2015 Conference
    Toronto, January 21-23, 2015

    As in previous years, I am delighted to once again present at the annual HRPA conference. This year I will deliver two sessions. On January 21, join Christine Felgueiras, Corporate Class Inc.’s Associate Director of Programs, and me for “First Impression: Here’s Your Second Chance!” Learn about the important factors that contribute to a winning first impression, so you can start every professional relationship off on the right foot.

    On January 22, together with corporate training consultant Marjorie Malpass, we address “The Power of Yes and Levity in Conversation”: a discussion where you learn how to become a great conversationalist and find out the useful – and sometimes surprising – advantages of using levity in professional conversations.

  • Executive Presence Workshop for Leaders and Executives
    Toronto, March 26-27, 2015
    Top leaders, corporate executives, and HR managers: this program is designed for you. For those who have already advanced within a career or a company, this workshop will give you even more of an edge and allow for continued personal advancement.

    Back by popular demand, our 2-day program in March will enable you to demonstrate the multi-dimensional aspects of Executive Presence with interactive classes and small group sessions. Among other topics, I will address powerful first impressions, crafting a memorable personal brand, effective communication in any context, and exuding confidence and poise.

  • Executive Presence System Atlanta Certification Training Program
    Atlanta, April 20-24, 2015

    After receiving much feedback for a fast-track program to the world of corporate training, we have designed the Executive Presence System Certification Training Program in Atlanta – the newest program from Corporate Class Inc.

This 5-day intensive training program will be your entryway into becoming a recognized Executive Presence trainer. During the interactive sessions, you will learn how to master your own Executive Presence, then develop the skills to train a diverse range of clients. By the end of the program, you will acquire the credentials that will lend you an edge in the corporate training industry.

Click here to read more about the program and to register. Mark your calendar: our early bird registration special ends on January 23.

With the diverse range of upcoming programs and opportunities, we hope to address your specific objectives when it comes to enhancing Executive Presence. Register for one of our programs today!

 

Do Not Let Fear Limit Your Executive Presence

fearaction“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

What do you think you could accomplish if you simply let go of your fears? Fear influences all of our choices and decisions, and often limits us where we most want to succeed. However, when we stop and take a good look at our fears, we often find that what is behind them is not so perilous after all.

If you want to develop your Executive Presence, you must address your fears and work through them. After all, Executive Presence is built on a strong foundation of confidence and strength in trying moments. And just as Executive Presence is a learned skill, you can also learn to confront your fears until they are simply a challenge that you have overcome.

Professionals hold many fears that prevent them from reaching goals in the workplace. Here are three common fears with tips on how to address them.

Fear of Public Speaking
This is one of the most prevalent fears in the workplace. The anxiety of making a mistake or delivering a poor presentation in front of a large group can be an enormous burden. If this is one of your fears, consider the following tips:

  • Practice, practice, practice – and then practice again. The more you practice your prepared notes, slide changes, and any other elements of your presentation, the less likely it is to go wrong. This alone will give you more confidence to proceed.
  • Keep in mind that the audience likely will not know if you have made a mistake. If you do, calmly keep going as if nothing happened.
  • Before taking the stage or the podium, take a few deep breaths. This will help to calm you before you begin.

Fear of Networking
Some professionals have great discomfort not with standing in front of a group of people, but rather in trying to make a connection with another individual. The potential awkwardness of networking leads some professionals to avoid it altogether. However, since making meaningful professional connections is integral to success, think about these strategies:

  • As with presentations, you can also practice networking. Discuss your professional interests and ideas with a family member or close friend before you converse with strangers at a conference or networking event.
  • Remember that networking events aren’t all about “selling” your professional goals – small talk is equally important for making connections. Before heading to an event, think of a few talking points in advance, so you don’t struggle to come up with conversation topics on the spot.

Fear of Advancement
Are you too apprehensive to assert yourself in the workplace and aim for a promotion or a raise? Or do you think that if you advance to a higher position, you will not be able to perform and won’t “deserve” the promotion? Consider these points:

  • If you are promoted, do not overthink it or doubt the decision. If the management team acknowledges that you should advance within your company, then it is clear that others recognize your successful performance and trust in your capabilities. Now it’s your turn to trust in your own ability.
  • If you aim to get ahead but fear rejection, remember that you will never advance if you simply do not try. When you try to succeed, there is an inevitable risk that you will not. Choose to accept this risk and proceed to strive toward your goals.

What are your greatest fears in the workplace? For more on this topic from our blog, see our previous post on Conquering the Fear of Public Speaking.

 

Your Selfie, Your Professional Self

How much information do you share about yourself online? On your personal Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media accounts, how large of a window do you let into your life?

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Posting personal photos and updates on social media is nothing new or unusual. If you do it, you are among millions of other users worldwide who share some elements of their private lives on a public platform. When this becomes an issue, however, is if the presentation of yourself on social media – whether through group photos, self-taken images or “selfies,” or written posts – is vastly different from the image you try to cultivate in the workplace.

“But this is my personal profile,” many have argued. “I have a separate profile for my work-related tweets and Facebook posts.” This may be the case, but lines become blurred between personal and professional on social media. A boss, client, or potential employer could have access to both – and it may not work to your advantage.

  • Be Careful What You Selfie For
    In some cases, the selfie and its subjects have acquired a connotation of being self-centred, overly indulgent, and simply unnecessary. Aside from this annoyance that some people feel when viewing the selfies of others, such images can harm the photographer if they reveal him or her participating in inappropriate behaviour.

    Although selfies have become normalized and encouraged – there is now even a professional camera designed for taking selfies – be wary of your own selfie-image and how often you post them. Before posting a selfie to social media, ask yourself if it aligns with the image you present in the office. One useful tip is to think of an actual person in your professional circle – whether an employer, client, or otherwise – and ask yourself whether you would mind if that individual saw the selfie you were about to post.

  • Don’t Compromise Your Reputation
    Reputation is an indispensible component of Executive Presence. However, even if you have worked for years to build up a flawless reputation in the boardroom, inappropriate online posts or images on personal accounts can shatter that reputation in an instant. Although you can heal a bruised reputation, it takes much more time and effort than maintaining a good reputation in the first place.

    Not only can questionable images hinder your reputation, but also hateful or negative written posts can do damage as well. Even something that seems like a harmless complaint can have a massive effect, especially if it is related to your company or line of work.

  • First Impressions Are Not Always in Person
    First impressions do not always occur face-to-face. In fact, an increasing number of employers admit to reviewing job candidates’ social media accounts before hiring. According to a 2014 Jobvite poll, some employers not only factor in appropriate images and posts, but also details such as spelling and grammar.

    If you are concerned about your online first impression, take steps to improve its quality – or limit its accessibility. If others tag you in images you would not like to be widely available, remove the tag and ask friends not to tag you in the future. Increase the privacy settings on your Facebook account and consider making your Twitter private as well.

Remember that if your social media accounts are widely accessible, there is no difference between your professional and personal image – anyone can see both. For more on social media and professionalism, see our previous posts “Dining Etiquette in the Age of Food Selfies” and “Spring Cleaning for Your LinkedIn Profile.”

 

Start Fresh in the New Year

PhotoCredit-Tweak-Your-BizIt may sound cliché to promote the New Year as a time for new beginnings, but there are many good reasons that January 1st can be an excellent moment for a fresh start in your professional life. Not only is it the start of a new calendar year, but also many businesses start their new fiscal year, the holiday rush is finally over, and new projects and initiatives frequently begin at this time.

With the start of a new year, it is best to begin with a fresh frame of mind. Here are a few steps you can take to start 2015 off right.

  • Outline your professional goals for the year.
    Take time for yourself early in 2015 to reflect on and outline your professional goals for the coming year. Without this time for reflection, many people continue their work at status quo and do not think seriously about what challenges and accomplishments they hope to meet in their job.

    A year’s length is the perfect amount of time for this kind of planning: it is a short enough span to foresee the end of attainable goals, but long enough to achieve something meaningful or make a significant change. It is through self-evaluation and reflection that you can begin to recognize what you would like to accomplish in your career.

  • Review and refine your schedule.
    The holidays can be so busy that we often do not take time to think about whether we are maximizing our productivity through an organized schedule. Instead, we simply scramble to get it all done.

    If the activity slows down somewhat after the holidays, review your recurring schedule as well as the deadlines approaching in the coming weeks or months. Even the simple act of looking over your calendar can help to inspire ideas for upcoming projects that you previously pushed off as “next year” in your mind. Additionally, revisiting your regular schedule can help you to consider changes that will allow you to maximize your productivity in the New Year.

  • Clean up your office space.
    The physical spaces in which you work can impact your productivity, attitude, and outlook, as well as the way others perceive your company. After the holidays, an office clean-up is especially necessary: no one benefits from tinsel and stale Christmas cookies as we head into the New Year.

    Ensure that someone is accountable or that there is a group effort to tidy what is left of the holiday decorations. This could even begin before December is over, depending on when your office closes for the holidays. Take additional time to prep your personal office or cubicle space for the start of the year.

  • Clean up your inbox.
    Just as we spend many hours in our physical office every day, we also spend many hours in our digital spaces. An overcrowded inbox can leave you feeling already behind on your work, even when the New Year has only just begun.

    At the start of January, set aside a few extra hours to archive the emails you don’t need, categorize what you have read, respond to any outstanding requests, and catch up on what you have flagged or marked unread. Little can be more overwhelming than the feeling of unfinished tasks following you from the previous year.

Happy New Year! For more posts on the season and its new beginnings from previous years, see “Time and Dedication are Your Keys to Success in 2014” and “New Year’s Resolutions for the Workplace.”

How to Handle Difficult Colleagues

No matter where you work, it is a certainty that you will have to work with a difficult co-worker at some point in your career. In fact, you may have met him or her already: a difficult colleague can be someone who complains constantly, does not contribute equally, is always ready to start an argument, or even engages in bullying.

In many circumstances, it can be hard to know the right thing to say or do in response to someone whose behaviour is uncooperative and irrational. However, there are a few responses you can rely on that will make the situation easier to handle in many contexts.

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  • Don’t fight fire with fire.
    If someone is getting into a heated argument or accusing others without thinking, you might begin to feel yourself getting worked up and ready to fight back.

    While it takes great restraint, try not to let someone’s passion or anger influence your own behaviour. “Fighting fire with fire,” as the saying goes, will only escalate the situation. Instead, take a deep breath, try to maintain a cool head, and counter his or her irrationality with logical and measured responses. While doing so, do match their emotions. If someone is on fire and you speak in a slow and calm voice, you will only aggravate them even more. You do not have to yell and tell, simply match the passion in your voice and the cadence of your speech with theirs.

  • Don’t take it personally.
    When a colleague is acting rudely and is difficult to work with, know that this behaviour is not directed at you personally. Instead, a colleague’s challenging behaviour in the workplace is often a result of his or her own stress, whether in the office or at home. He or she also may be coping with problems that you are not aware of.

    Although it is unprofessional and unkind to be rude to others as a result of one’s own stress, keeping this idea in mind will help you to cope when faced with difficult behaviour, as well as to be empathetic to your colleague.

  • Focus on your positive professional relationships.
    While you might have one demanding co-worker who overshadows your workday, try not to focus all your attention on this single relationship. Instead, remind yourself of all the supportive, friendly, and professional relationships that you have in your network.

    When you maintain your attention on building and maintaining strong relationships with the people who are truly a joy to work with, it will help you to feel more positive and productive rather than diminished by one individual’s difficult personality.

  • Hold your ground—and pick your battles.
    You do not always need to take someone’s challenging behaviour lying down – and you must know when to fight back and when to let it go. Constantly trying to resist and argue with a difficult colleague can become extremely exhausting and stressful. Additionally, always reacting to a co-worker’s behaviour can affect your own professional image by portraying you as someone who is combative and reactive to provocation.
  • If it becomes a serious issue, involve HR.
    A difficult colleague can simply be testy or uncooperative. However, when an individual engages in sustained workplace bullying or any form of abuse, this becomes a much more serious issue. If the problem escalates to this level, it is appropriate to contact the Human Resources department within your company and report abusive behaviour. Your HR department will help to take the necessary steps to solve this critical workplace issue.

Relying on your Executive Presence can help you to navigate many challenges in the workplace, including dealing with difficult colleagues. For more on this topic, see our previous blog post, “How Executive Presence and Other Skills Can Help You Solve Issues in the Workplace.” How do you cope with challenging personalities in your working environment?

Multitasking Can Hinder Your Executive Presence

55777753In recent years, several studies have suggested that it is actually impossible for the human brain to multitask. Yet we continue to persist in our attempts: every day many of us juggle simultaneous responsibilities at work and an endless to-do list at home, all while managing alerts and messages on multiple devices.

Not only is your brain truly incapable of multitasking, but also trying to multitasking constantly can hinder your Executive Presence. In this post, I discuss how multitasking can weaken your presence and I provide some suggestions for cutting back on this habit.

First, imagine yourself working a room – you walk into a space and instantly feel confident, at ease, and ready to make a great impression. You are prepared to connect with others in a meaningful and sincere manner. With this approach and attitude, you exhibit great presence.

Now imagine yourself trying to work a room while simultaneously sending texts and emails from your smartphone. It’s impossible! Your body language will show that you are more interested in your phone than the situation at hand, and in your distraction you will remain disconnected and isolated from the individuals in the room. In other words, you will have no presence.

Constantly attempting to multitask can hinder other aspects of work life that contribute to your Executive Presence as well. For example, it can impact the effectiveness of your communication. Have you ever tried to work on a task or write an email while talking on the phone? Chances are, all results from this type of multitasking will turn out sloppily. On the phone you will sound distracted, and your task or email may contain careless mistakes. A combination of these elements over time will begin to reflect poorly on your overall presence.

If this is the case, how can you reduce multitasking to improve your Executive Presence? At the pace of today’s corporate culture, it is incredibly difficult to prevent yourself from multitasking. Our working environments and tools are designed for it. However, use this idea as motivation: you will improve your presence as well as become more productive when focusing on a single task at a time.

A few tips for staying focused and directed in your work:

  • Start your day focused. Do not wake up and immediately check your email or phone. Instead, leave enough time in the morning to have a quiet moment or a brief walk outside. This can be refreshing and help you to take on one task at a time throughout the day with renewed energy.
  • During meetings, leave technology behind. Do not try to catch up on emails when others are leading a meeting. It will show disrespect to your colleagues, and you will not retain any of the information exchanged. Additionally, you will not be able to contribute anything of value if you remain distracted throughout the meeting.
  • Allocate set amounts of time to each of your tasks. For example, if you allow yourself one hour to complete a single task, chances are you will be much more productive and efficient in that single hour than if you worked on it throughout the afternoon while getting distracted by other things.
  • What are your tactics for staying focused and dedicated to the task at hand? For more on the disadvantages of multitasking, see Time’s “Don’t Multitask: Your Brain Will Thank You” or “Why Multitasking Doesn’t Work” from Forbes.

Holiday Decorations in the Office: How Much is Too Much Cheer?

3054392608_7a41c66b3c_oEverywhere you look, holiday decorations are already appearing. Christmas trees are cropping up in stores and in city squares; wreaths are being placed on doors and walls; dazzling holiday lights are going up anywhere they can be hung.

At this time of year, many companies want to bring the holiday cheer into their offices as well. If this is the case for you and your organization, feel free to deck the halls and cubicles — but remember to keep your office looking professional throughout the festivities as well. This post outlines a few suggestions for a tasteful, efficient, and joyful season of holiday decorating at the office.

  • Simple and Tasteful Decorations
    In an office that maintains a polished and professional look throughout the year, it may be jarring for staff, clients, or visitors to meet with over-the-top Christmas decorations when they enter your lobby.

    Ensure that the holiday decorations chosen for your office reflect the image of the company and its spaces. Whether your company’s brand and aesthetics are clean and simple, colourful and creative, or neutral and natural, start with the company brand as a guideline for holiday decorations. As a rule of thumb, toned-down and natural decorations generally look more professional than bright and excessive holiday lights or oversized figurines.

  • Which Holidays to Acknowledge?
    Especially in an office that is open to the public, non-denominational winter decorations are likely your safest bet. Yet if you would like to feature decorations that are explicitly affiliated with Christmas, also consider the backgrounds and traditions of other staff members, clients, partners, or frequent visitors to your office. They might expect to see representations of winter holidays that they celebrate as well.
  • Artificial versus Natural Decorations
    Little is more festive than rich winter greenery and the sharp scent of fir or pine. However, using real plants (such as fir wreaths, garlands, and trees or potted poinsettias) can prove difficult to care for. Set-up, maintenance, and removal of natural decorations often require much more effort to keep clean and healthy than their faux counterparts.

    If you are hiring an external service to supply and manage your holiday decorations throughout the season, natural decorations are a fine option. Yet if you have to balance your full-time work with the extra task of decorating the office, stick to fake greenery.

  • Timing is Everything
    Avoid holiday spirit overload by timing decorations appropriately. If you follow the lead of many stores by bringing out Christmas cheer immediately after Halloween, colleagues may feel hesitant to embrace the season.

    Similarly, do not wait until February to take down decorations. The New Year is a time for new beginnings: signify this with a fresh, clean office free of stale decorations.

For further reading on making the most of the holiday season, see our previous blog posts “Stay Organized During the Busy Holiday Season” and “Dining Etiquette for Holiday Cocktail Parties.”

How to Motivate Colleagues for Effective and Balanced Teamwork

iStock_000002328740XSmallLeading a group project or team initiative is an excellent opportunity to demonstrate your leadership and management skills. However, little is more frustrating than when team members do not contribute equally to the task at hand. Uncooperative group members may not complete their work on time, refrain from participating in group meetings, or approach work with a negative attitude.

While unequal contributions from team members make projects unnecessarily difficult, this behaviour occurs more often than you may think. Such behaviour can hinder the success of a project – both the process and the end result.

As team leader, how can you motivate all team members to be engaged and supportive during a group effort? Last week’s post discussed how to motivate yourself; this week, we focus on others around you. Here are three suggestions for managing a balanced and effective team.

  • Delegate Tasks According to the Interests of Group Members
    When employees are not pursuing tasks that they are passionate about, interested in, or skilled at, they can be far less committed to approach them with an enthusiastic outlook.

    When assigning tasks for a group initiative, pay attention to the interests and abilities of your team. If you customize your division of labour to these characteristics, your project may proceed more smoothly. Further, it will show that you are interested in the needs of each individual group member, which could boost their morale and trust in you.

  • Foster Good Communication on All Platforms
    Practically speaking, all group contributions should be readily and easily accessible for all other team members to access. If your team does not work from a shared server at the office, ensure that files are available through cloud-based sharing platforms or other formats that are easy to use for group members. This tactic, as well as setting clear goals and due dates, will help everyone to stay aware of the progress of the work as a whole and better enable others to contribute their portions on time.

    Logistical matters aside, it is also important to foster effective communication among group members and provide opportunities to discuss issues. When issues remain unaddressed for long periods of time, they can grow until they are no longer manageable and may hinder the success of the project.

  • Create a Tone of Friendliness and Respect
    You do not need to become great friends with all of the members of your team. However, it is important to generate an atmosphere of friendliness and respect among all team members. When you maintain a friendly tone (even in the face of issues!), the group dynamic will be far more pleasant and it will be easier for team members to commit themselves to their work – and remain committed throughout the process.

    Further, as team members begin to produce results, ensure that you are recognizing each colleague equally for their efforts. Imbalanced recognition can make it seem that you prioritize or favour certain individuals, which will reflect poorly on your leadership skills.

For further reading on managing effective teams and motivating team members, see our previous blog post on “Top Team Building Activities” or the Harvard Business Review’s “Make Your Good Team Great.”

Keep a Bright Outlook during Dark Winter Days

unnamedAs winter approaches, the days are getting darker – until it feels like the middle of the night when we leave the office after 5:00 pm! During these dark and cold months, many people feel less energetic and motivated, which can affect quality of work and productivity in the workplace.

Yet in business, attitude is everything. How you approach your work, how you interact with your colleagues, or how you view your own professional path: a positive attitude is important in all of these aspects of a career. How, then, can you maintain a bright and sunny attitude, even when the sun sets far earlier than the day is done?

Here are three ways to maintain a positive outlook at the workplace, no matter what season or weather.

  • Bring Levity into Your Day
    Humour and professionalism may seem like an unusual combination. However, when delivered appropriately, humour can connect people and increase effective interactions in the workplace.

    According to Marjorie Malpass, a trainer with Corporate Class Inc. and a professional comedian, actress and instructor at The Second City, bringing levity into the workplace fosters inclusion and collaborative engagement. Additionally, laughter is infectious: it can boost your attitude as well as that of everyone else around you.

    Using comedic improv training with participants, Ms. Malpass delivers Corporate Class Inc. Lunch and Learn sessions on bringing levity into the workplace and increasing effective interaction in everyday business.

  • Seek Out Light and Warmth
    Although it may be dark and cold outside, you can still find ways to keep light and warmth in your life during winter months. For example, if darkness severely affects your mood, consider investing in a light therapy box or taking regular morning walks outside after the sun has risen.

    Or, instead of heading home immediately after work, try spending an hour at your local gym. Moving around after a long day of sitting at your desk will help you to feel refreshed, accomplished and motivated. Additionally, activity will keep you warm, no matter how cold it is outside.

    If you have the opportunity to escape to a warm destination, be sure to make the most of your vacation. Unplug from technology and, if possible, leave all work at your desk until you return. Focusing on your time to recover will help you reenergize for the rest of the long winter.

  • Show Gratitude at the Office
    Just as Marjorie Malpass suggests that laughter is infectious, so too are gestures of thankfulness at the workplace. According to the Forbes article 5 Quick Ways You Can Bring Positive Psychology to Your Workplace, thanking employees can foster a positive tone and help employees to feel motivated.

    By exhibiting thankfulness, a positive attitude can endure and spread among other employees as well – especially if saying “thank you” is a regular occurrence. Read more here about how managers and supervisors can express their gratitude meaningfully and sincerely to employees.

How do you stay motivated, engaged and positive during long and dark winters?

 

Be Prepared: How Backup Plans Can Bolster Executive Presence

“Be prepared” is the official motto of the Girl Guides, but the phrase works just as well in business, too. When you are caught off-guard with an unexpected situation or a difficult task on the job, you want to be able to offer the most effective response and work efficiently through any challenge.

Having backup plans for various unforeseen situations can help you to stay calm and poised on the job, no matter what roadblocks come up in your workday. Maintaining such control in the face of the unexpected will allow your Executive Presence to shine through on a regular basis.

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Here are three backup plans you may consider adopting for those unexpected moments on the job.

  • Backup Plan #1: Make Technology Work for You
    Even as technology continues to advance and become more user-friendly, you can never fully trust that it will perform without a hitch. Whenever you need to rely on technology, ensure that you have multiple options if one method fails.

    For example, before giving a presentation, save your slideshow in multiple locations and formats. If a file is corrupted or accidentally deleted from a USB key, you can quickly refer to another version that you have saved in a cloud format, such as Dropbox or Google Drive. If you present using notes from a tablet, consider printing your notes in hard copy format alongside the digital version. This will allow for a backup plan if your tablet runs out of batteries or cannot connect to the Internet.

  • Backup Plan #2: Maintain Your Best Image
    While you can leave the house looking put-together and professional, you never know what might happen on the way to work or at the office. Poor weather, spills, or accidental rips or tears can throw a wrench into your business attire.

    To prevent one of these elements from ruining your professional image, keep an extra pressed shirt or sweater in your desk drawer at the office. It will not take up much space, and could save you a trip home or to the store during your lunch break in the face of an attire mishap.

    Also consider keeping a spare jacket or blazer in the office closet. This will allow you to quickly adopt a business formal look, in the event that a significant client or partner unexpectedly arrives at the office or an impromptu formal dinner is scheduled.

  • Backup Plan #3: Consider Multiple Options for Solving Issues
    When it comes to solving an issue with a colleague or trying to resolve a difficult negotiation, the mindset that there is only “one way out” can cause undue stress – especially when the negotiation heads in the opposite direction of your desired path.

Always approach a problem with several backup plans or multiple options to solve it. Providing various choices will help you to build a relationship with the other party, as it shows your dedication to solving an issue with the interests of both parties in mind.

Also, multiple options can relieve the pressure of working toward an ultimatum, allowing you to maintain a cool head or “grace under fire” – an example exhibiting gravitas, a key component of Executive Presence.

No matter in which industry or position you work, there is always the possibility of unexpected situations arising on the job. What kinds of backup plans do you have in place to deal with them?