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Do Not Let Fear Limit Your Executive Presence

Do Not Let Fear Limit Your Executive Presence

fearaction“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

What do you think you could accomplish if you simply let go of your fears? Fear influences all of our choices and decisions, and often limits us where we most want to succeed. However, when we stop and take a good look at our fears, we often find that what is behind them is not so perilous after all.

If you want to develop your Executive Presence, you must address your fears and work through them. After all, Executive Presence is built on a strong foundation of confidence and strength in trying moments. And just as Executive Presence is a learned skill, you can also learn to confront your fears until they are simply a challenge that you have overcome.

Professionals hold many fears that prevent them from reaching goals in the workplace. Here are three common fears with tips on how to address them.

Fear of Public Speaking
This is one of the most prevalent fears in the workplace. The anxiety of making a mistake or delivering a poor presentation in front of a large group can be an enormous burden. If this is one of your fears, consider the following tips:

  • Practice, practice, practice – and then practice again. The more you practice your prepared notes, slide changes, and any other elements of your presentation, the less likely it is to go wrong. This alone will give you more confidence to proceed.
  • Keep in mind that the audience likely will not know if you have made a mistake. If you do, calmly keep going as if nothing happened.
  • Before taking the stage or the podium, take a few deep breaths. This will help to calm you before you begin.

Fear of Networking
Some professionals have great discomfort not with standing in front of a group of people, but rather in trying to make a connection with another individual. The potential awkwardness of networking leads some professionals to avoid it altogether. However, since making meaningful professional connections is integral to success, think about these strategies:

  • As with presentations, you can also practice networking. Discuss your professional interests and ideas with a family member or close friend before you converse with strangers at a conference or networking event.
  • Remember that networking events aren’t all about “selling” your professional goals – small talk is equally important for making connections. Before heading to an event, think of a few talking points in advance, so you don’t struggle to come up with conversation topics on the spot.

Fear of Advancement
Are you too apprehensive to assert yourself in the workplace and aim for a promotion or a raise? Or do you think that if you advance to a higher position, you will not be able to perform and won’t “deserve” the promotion? Consider these points:

  • If you are promoted, do not overthink it or doubt the decision. If the management team acknowledges that you should advance within your company, then it is clear that others recognize your successful performance and trust in your capabilities. Now it’s your turn to trust in your own ability.
  • If you aim to get ahead but fear rejection, remember that you will never advance if you simply do not try. When you try to succeed, there is an inevitable risk that you will not. Choose to accept this risk and proceed to strive toward your goals.

What are your greatest fears in the workplace? For more on this topic from our blog, see our previous post on Conquering the Fear of Public Speaking.

 

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