Ways to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace

Not sure if your company is doing all that it can to improve workplace diversity and inclusion?

Organizations that prioritize and promote diversity, equity, and inclusion reap tons of benefits for the business and their employees. 

Inclusive work environments often produce more motivated, productive, and outspoken employees. Additionally, productive employees often go the extra mile for the companies they work for, which can also boost company profits and revenue streams.

Moreover, inclusivity and diversity are common elements that job seekers look for when applying for a job. As a result, an inclusive work environment can attract more applicants.

But the above benefits are only realized once your organization promotes diversity and inclusivity properly.

Here are a few ways organizations can do this:

Mix up your teams

The easiest way to boost inclusivity and diversity in the workplace is to ensure every team and department has a diverse group of employees. 

Diverse teams are often more creative and productive since they consist of people with different skills, backgrounds, experiences, etc.

Be aware of unconscious bias

An organization with diverse employees may experience some internal unconscious bias. As a result, organizations must introduce unconscious bias training.

Unconscious bias encompasses feelings or attitudes that are held subconsciously. Consequently, it’s often hard to spot this kind of bias. As a result, organizations need to train their managers and leaders to recognize this form of bias. This way, the managing team can set clear standards for employees and help employees understand when they are biased towards a particular group or employee. Companies must nip this issue in the bud since prejudice and bias can make employees feel uncomfortable and undervalued.

Develop a strategic training program

Diversity and inclusivity training can help managers and employees understand how cultural differences impact day-to-day operations. For example, team members in a diverse team may have different communication preferences or styles. As a result, managers need to put clear processes in place to avoid miscommunication or missed deadlines due to communication issues.

Organizations should also ensure that their inclusion efforts align with their overarching inclusivity goals and identified challenges. Attendance in these training programs should also be optional as opposed to compulsory. This way, employees can attend and learn about one another out of their own free will. 

Promote pay equity

To promote equal pay, you need to consider whether or not your certain employees are receiving equal pay for similar roles or responsibilities. This way, you can identify which employees are underpaid for dedicating the same amount of time, skills, and knowledge. 

By using HR or people analytics, organizations can pinpoint salary or wage gaps within a particular department or team. Moreover, managers can spot payment gap patterns or trends within a specific minority group – people of color, women, people with disabilities, etc.

Communicate the importance of managing bias

Organizations can help employees understand the importance of managing bias through training and employee resource groups. Employees must know that it’s human to have unconscious biases, but that doesn’t mean it’s acceptable. Internal bias training can help employees and managers recognize when they’re stereotyping. This way, every team member can work towards creating an integrated, inclusive work environment. 

If you want to improve your company’s workplace diversity and inclusion, visit the Corporate Class website today. 

We over bespoke services that can help you improve workplace diversity and inclusion effectively while also boosting employee engagement and innovation.

How to foster diversity and inclusion in the workplace

Want to know how to foster diversity and inclusion in the office?

Organizations that invest in diversity and inclusion often have more productive employees who feel accepted, valued, and welcomed. 

Additionally, diverse teams are often more engaged and offer unique problem-solving solutions to decision-making processes.

So if your company already employs a diverse workforce that encompasses a range of religions, backgrounds, ages, and genders, you might feel that you can check the diversity and inclusion box off.

But it’s not that simple. 

There’s always room for improvement when creating an inclusive work environment that genuinely boosts employee engagement and productivity.

In this blog post, we’ll cover improving diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Confirm executive support

The image of your executive team can impact how your employees and external stakeholders view your company and its culture. As a result, it’s a good idea to have a diverse executive team that includes unique ethnic groups and gender diversity. Additionally, your team should consist of people from different cultural and religious backgrounds. This is crucial since leaders are often role models for employees and set the standards for the workforce.

Additionally, an effective way to boost executive support is by introducing training at the top management level. This way, your executive team understands the importance of diversity and inclusion and treats their employees fairly and equally.

Leverage multiple tools and channels for employee feedback

Inclusive companies can use surveys and other forms of employee feedback to better understand their employees’ concerns and needs. By deploying surveys, you’ll better understand and combat any patterns of discrimination and structures of prejudice in the company.

It’s also a good idea to incorporate anonymous feedback. This way, you can really drill down on more minor, pressing issues in specific departments or areas of work.

Moreover, team leaders and managers can use check-in tools to get personalized feedback from employees. This way, employees know they can voice their opinions and that their managers care. 

Approach with your heart in the right place

If you want to promote diversity and inclusion, you need to approach business processes strategically and compassionately.

One way to do this is by acknowledging cultural holidays. You can do this by asking employees what their plans are for a particular religious or cultural holiday when a team meeting is ending. Additionally, you can set appointments and deadlines while considering special religious and cultural holidays. This way, employees know that you are aware of their needs and that you offer them the flexibility to commit to their cultural and religious needs and work commitments. 

Promote pay equity

Managers and senior staff should evaluate and promote equal opportunities and pay for every employee.

Organizations can evaluate which staff members are being underpaid for similar roles and responsibilities. This also helps diverse companies understand which minority groups are being mistreated. Managers should also identify pay gap patterns across departments and get to the root cause of these issues. This way, diverse employees know that the management team is working towards creating an inclusive and equal work environment and that they are valued. 

If you want to improve your company’s workplace diversity and inclusion, visit the Corporate Class website today. 

We over bespoke services that will help you foster diversity and inclusion in the workplace while boosting employee engagement and productivity.

4 Things That Men Can Learn from Boundless Women

Have you ever wondered what men can learn from boundless women? Gender should never be a factor in the traits of a successful leader. Ideally, leadership qualities are determined by a person’s personality traits and strengths, whether male or female. In reality, however, when women take on leadership roles, they are often underappreciated and undervalued in comparison to their male colleagues.

Quick disclaimer before we proceed, elocuted by Inkaar actress, Chitrangda Singh: “Feminism is not about male bashing or anti-male, but about gender equality and a sense of equal opportunity!”

Don’t Lean in When You’ve Got Nothing to Lean in About

One of the reasons the world lacks great leaders is that leaders are mostly selected through interviews where opinions are swayed by charisma and confidence. Those who comfortably promote themselves, accept credit for team achievements, and act assertively (or even aggressively) are seen as accomplished and powerful.

Because, according to organizational psychologist Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, men are typically more deceived about their talents than women are”, they are not shy about blowing their own trumpets. Thus, men are perceived and chosen as formidable leaders. No wonder writer Nell Scovell collaborated with Chief Operating Officer of Facebook, Sheryl Sandberg, in 2013 to write a book that advocates that women “press ahead, project confidence, “sit at the table and physically lean in” to be heard in the workplace.

The only problem with that is that there has never been any link between the competence of candidates and their ability to lean in. Now is the time to ditch stereotype honchos and applaud authenticity. Rather screen applicants for their expertise, experience, and essential leadership skills such as acumen, humility, compassion, integrity, and a growth mindset.

Know Your Own Limitations

If social media and gender stereotypes are to be believed, women are a bundle of insecurities. While it’s true that one of many gender differences is the self-critical nature of women, it is more about self-awareness than self-flagellation.

There is a two-fold upside to this:

1. Great leaders have a healthy dose of humility. Instead of pretending to have all the answers and be masters of everything, they:

  • Know their strengths and weaknesses
  • Harness the aptitudes of everyone in their network
  • Are approachable and receptive to new ideas
  • Welcome and applaud the contributions of others.

2. Being aware of their limitations directs the effort women put into bridging the gap between where they are and where they would like to be. Because women are generally less overconfident than men, female leaders tend to work harder at increasing their ability and performance.

Motivate Through Transformation

Across all industries, change is unavoidable. Transformational leadership can help employees not only accept change but embrace it by cultivating a culture of accountability and autonomy.

Transformational leaders inspire higher levels of engagement, performance, and productivity by:

  • Championing self-motivation and personal development
  • Demonstrating integrity and urging the same of others
  • Nurturing an ethical work environment based on unambiguous values, standards, and priorities.
  • Fostering a company culture where employees move from self-interest to working towards a shared goal
  • Promoting authenticity, collaboration, and frank communication
  • Offering coaching and mentoring but encouraging professional independence in employees.

Academics have long established that women are more likely to lead and motivate others by the transformation of their attitudes and beliefs. Men would be better leaders if they too influenced people with meaning and purpose.

Put Your People Ahead of Yourself

More than anything else, great leaders have integrity. Part of being a leader with integrity is putting your ego aside and valuing individuals and your team above tasks and results.

Women are less inclined to seek out leadership roles purely because they want the status of a corner office, impressive title, or larger paycheck.

When we embrace the power of our feminine skills, we are redefining leadership where feminine is as strong and powerful as the masculine.” -Birute Regine, EdD, Founder of Iron Butterfly Power Circles

Would you like to put what men can learn from boundless women into practice at work? Our self-paced online leadership training program provides a step-by-step process to develop your leadership skills. Contact Corporate Class Inc. for more information.