Executive Presence is neither exclusive nor elusive – It can be learned!

CharismaWe’re announcing a unique, two-day Executive Presence Training Session taking place in Toronto, on September 18 and 19. Previously only offered through corporate channels, CCI’s Executive Presence (EP) program is now available to you, your staff members or individuals you may have identified as candidates for this training. Enrollment is open.

We’ve timed the workshop in anticipation of our annual post-vacation barrage of calls for training. After the slower pace of summer, many people decide it’s time to take action, perhaps the result of Labour Day Resolutions!

Although many experts have tackled the complexities of EP, New York’s Center for Talent Innovation is a key player in addressing its impact. CTI’s mission is twofold: to drive research that leverages talent and to create a community of senior executives who understand that utilizing global talent is at the heart of competitive success. Last fall, CTI published a report offering a key revelation: EP accounts for just over 26% of what it takes to get promoted. Yes, performance is critical and knowing the right people a factor, but without EP even the overtly ambitious don’t stand a chance of promotion.

One of the most frequently cited examples of what defines EP is magnetism, the ability to walk into a room and instantly galvanize everyone present. While this is, indeed, a much sought after component, it is not the singular defining characteristic. EP is multi-faceted. It is complex. Most importantly, it is absolutely de rigueur for aspiring leaders.

I can’t stress enough that there are many styles of EP – there is no single textbook standard. Ambition and determination are definitely prerequisites, but without a doubt, it can be learned.

Take for example Richard Branson. His passion for his multi-faceted business empire knows no bounds. There he is on the front page week after week. Mr. Branson bubbles over with enthusiasm for every new venture. What most people don’t realize is that he openly admits he had to train himself to be an extrovert, to make those speeches and acquire a public face. He credits former airline magnate Freddy Laker with laying out the critical intricacies of powerful PR but ultimately, the credit belongs in Mr. Branson’s court for overcoming his shy, introverted ways.

Although extraordinary publicity is synonymous with his name, Mr. Branson also scores very high on “people skills.” Happy staff perform better ensuring escalated customer return rates, is the essence of his philosophy. With this attitude, it stands to reason that his employees are performance driven. Mr. Branson is a brilliant motivator.

Which brings me to President Obama and Michelle Obama. Talk about motivating skills! Together or separately, they positively radiate EP. Yes, they also have power and vision in common with Richard Branson but where he exudes a life of the party spirit; they suggest authority of the highest order.

Executive Presence crosses all party lines and professions. Toronto chef and TV celebrity Mark McEwan has a positively statesman-like presence. Light years removed from the egocentric, tantrum spouting behaviour of bygone chefs, Chef McEwan projects a sense of Commander-in-Chief of his kitchens. He even carries off chef whites with the same elegance as his impeccable sportswear. Another terrific motivator, he’s helped many young Canadians rise to the challenges of a culinary career.

Personal Style
We know DNA carries your own, individual imprint. True EP utilizes the upper limits of your strengths; it is as individual as you are.

During the September workshop, we’ll present the same program that has made CCI the go-to source for EP training. Across all industries from multi-national corporations to local businesses and from government bureaus to educational institutions, we encourage participants to evolve their own personal style through a series of training modules. Our interactive approach ensures all participants experience full support and opportunities to practice, discuss and reflect on the learning experience.

We’ll cover a lot of ground in two days.

For starters, we explore and explain the key components of charisma, leadership, communication and interpersonal engagement. We focus on the EP4 Fundamentals and how to improve your Executive Presence.

Day one starts with First Impressions and their pivotal role in developing and self-managing EP. We discuss how they are created, keys to the charisma component – even how to overcome a misleading or awkward first impression.

Next up, Communication Skills and Body Language. So often underestimated, we show participants the subtle distinctions of this silent language:  How to send the right signals and how to interpret, or translate other people’s signals. We move on to Interpersonal Skills, including Working a Room, one of our most frequently requested segments.

Over lunch, we focus on Doing Business Over Meals. Imagine acquiring the confidence to dine anywhere, with anyone! Everything is covered: seating, conversation, food and wine, picking up the tab. We review guest and host roles, from C-suite or management to client and guest.

Day two starts with Techno Communication Skills. From email to smart phones and teleconferences to videos – we focus on poised and polished connections. Best Workplace Practices is all about appropriate behaviour within the context of an organization’s culture. Boardroom savvy, chairing meetings and presentation skills are only a few of the topics covered. Professional Appearance emphasizes the keys to managing a professional image with increased confidence as a byproduct.

And it all begins September 18! Click here to reserve your spot (Space is limited).

A detailed overview of the workshop can be found here. For questions about who should attend or more details about the content, please contact me directly.

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